Diabetes

The topic is Diabetes

Course Competency:

  • Compare the care models for nursing practice specific to the older adult.

Transferable Skill:

  • Information Literacy: Discovering information reflectively, understanding how information is produced and valued, and using information to create new knowledge and participate ethically in communities of learning.

Your nursing supervisor likes the topic you chose for the in-service presentation and wants you to start researching! To make sure you get the project on the right track, your supervisor has asked you to do the following:

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  1. Using the Rasmussen Library, identify at least 2 resources pertaining to your topic.
  2. Prepare an annotated bibliography for the resources you identified. Each entry will include:
  3. the full APA formatted reference
  4. an annotation consisting of the following elements:
  • 2 to 4 sentences to summarize the main idea(s) of the source
  • 1 or 2 sentences to assess and evaluate the source
  • 1 or 2 sentences to reflect on the source

For information about making a research appointment with a Rasmussen librarian, evaluating the credibility of a source, or creating an annotated bibliography, consult the resources below.

Once you receive your graded submission, be sure to review the supervisor’s feedback. You want to make sure that your next submission shows that you made appropriate improvements based on the feedback.

Submit your completed assignment to the drop box below. Please check the Course Calendar for specific due dates.

Save your assignment as a Microsoft Word document. (Mac users, please remember to append the “.docx” extension to the filename.) The name of the file should be your first initial and last name, followed by an underscore and the name of the assignment, and an underscore and the date. An example is shown below:

 

Diabetes

Diabetes is the problem that I would teach the clients who are older adults and or with their family members. It is a common disorder in adults that affects how one’s body turns food into energy (Gregory et al., 2018). Diabetes disease usually occurs when a person’s blood sugar is too high. Older adults need to learn about the causes of diabetes, such as inactive lifestyle and overweight, to prevent them. However, various consequences of diabetes tend to affect older adults’ well-being, health and safety.

The first one is that it may result in an eye problem known as diabetic retinopathy. It is a kind of a disease that affects the eyesight of individuals who have diabetes. Additionally, diabetes also causes foot problems that can result in amputation if one fails to treat it (Maranta, Cianfanelli, & Cianflone, 2020). When the blood sugar is high, it can affect circulation, making the sores and the cuts heal slowly. The third consequence of diabetes is that it can cause stroke and heart attack. When one suffers from diabetes, high blood sugar levels for some time tend to damage the blood vessels, resulting in heart attacks and strokes in older adults. Besides, kidney problem is another consequence of diabetes. It may lead to kidney damage over a long time; hence it becomes difficult for the body to clear wastes from the body due to the high blood sugar levels (Maneze et al., 2019). Finally, diabetes also causes damage to the nerves, which is also known as neuropathy, due to the complications of high blood sugar levels. That condition makes it difficult for the nerves to pass messages between the brain and other body parts. It can affect how people see, move, feel or hear.

My main reason for selecting diabetes is that older adults and their family members need to know the causes and consequences of the problem. Thus, they will know how to manage it. Learning about the control of diabetes will enable them to save time and money.

References

Maranta, F., Cianfanelli, L., & Cianflone, D. (2020). Glycaemic control and vascular complications in diabetes mellitus type 2. In Diabetes: from Research to Clinical Practice (pp. 129-152). Springer, Cham.

Maneze, D., Weaver, R., Kovai, V., Salamonson, Y., Astorga, C., Yogendran, D., & Everett, B. (2019). “Some say no, some say yes”: Receiving inconsistent or insufficient information from healthcare professionals and consequences for diabetes self-management: A qualitative study in patients with type 2 diabetes. Diabetes research and clinical practice, 156, 107830.

Gregory, N. S., Seley, J. J., Dargar, S. K., Galla, N., Gerber, L. M., & Lee, J. I. (2018). Strategies to prevent readmission in high-risk patients with diabetes: the importance of an interdisciplinary approach. Current diabetes reports, 18(8), 1-7.